Lime Kiln Bay Wetland Guided Walks

W5.royal spoonbillEver wondered where your stormwater goes and what happens to it?

As part of the Wetland Awareness project OFF will be conducting free guided walks around the Wetland to show interested people how the quality of stormwater runoff is improved and the abundant native plants and wildlife that the wetland supports.

Saturday 20th February, 2016 3pm – 5pm
and
Saturday 19th March 2016 3pm – 5pm

 

Meet at corner Waterfall Rd and Acacia St. Oatley

Wear sturdy shoes and a hat, bring water and sunscreen
CLICK HERE FOR PROJECT FLYER

 

2016 Annual General Meeting

Right version white eye Green card

Our AGM was held at the RSL Oatley on February 2016. Secretary Liz Cameron presented the minutes and report for 2015. President Graham Lalchere’s speech reflected on OFF activities through a lense of  “Thinking Globally, Acting Locally”. CLICK HERE FOR FULL Presidents AGM Address

Election of  2016 committee was overseen by David Crawford acting as returning officer.

President  Graham Lalchere

Vice Presidents- Alan Fairley & Graham Fry

Secretary Liz Cameron

Treasurer – Rodger Robertson

A full list of committee members will be posted on line as soon as our program for the year is published.

The official part of the meeting was followed by a dazzling array of members’ slides.  Alan Fairly – Elora & Ajanta Caves in India; Shaun Keays-Byrne Oatley Park & OFF activities; Graham Fry – Smiggins  trips; Sharyn Cullis – Small African Fauna ; Phil Andersen -  Large African Fauna Melina Amerasinghe – Sri-Lanka; Graham Lalchere – Central & Western Australia.

The meeting was followed by supper. With a generous spread of  goodies available members mingled till closing time.  The new venue worked well with equipment and catering facilities.

 

 

Drains are for Rain

The Leader 20 Jan 2016 Its clear drains are for rain so butt out
Oatley Flora and Fauna Conservation Society  is painting messages on drains in the Penshurst, Mortdale and Oatley area to remind people of what drains are for and what their misuse can do to wetlands and river systems. Their current target is the drain system that flows into the Lime Kiln Bay wetland.
 
Leader published the photos and LKB/ drain stencilling story in Wed 20 January 2016 edition..
It is on-line on The Leader website.  There is room on the website version for the public to make comments.

Lime Kiln Bay Guided Walks

IMG_1683OFF conducted free guided walks on 8 and 12 December around Lime Kiln Bay Wetland to show interested people how the wetlands improve the quality of storm water runoff and the abundant native plants and wildlife that the wetland supports.

The walks are part of  a  project undertaken by the society to raise awareness in the local community of potential environmental impacts on the wetland from urban activities. What goes down the drain ends up in the wetland and then into the Georges River. The project is being funded from the NSW Minister for the Environment’s Conservation Fund. It will benefit the local community and Council by improving the long-term health of local waterways and reducing maintenance costs of Council’s drainage infrastructure.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE Project

CLICK HERE FOR PHOTOS OF THE WALKIMG_1723 IMG_1721

Being Green 2006 – 2015

Magpie with green circle backgroundIn celebration  of OFFs 60th anniversary, Alan Fairley (OFF Vice President) has updated Being Green – The History of Oatley Flora and Fauna Conservation Society.  The latest chapter covers successes and challenges experienced by the society during the last decade 2006 – 2015.  We hope to have a complete printed copy available soon at meetings and on the web.

CLICK LINKS BELOW READ A pdf copies of OFF HISTORY

. Being Green Ch8 – Sucesses and Challenges 2006- 2015

. Being Green the first 50 yrs OFF  1955 – 2005

 

Mark Coure MP launches “Drains are Just for Rain”

Mark Coure 25 Nov (2)On 25 November, Mark Coure MP launched OFF storm water drain stencil project. The society plans to stencil 120 signs to raise awareness in the local community of potential environmental impacts on the Lime Kiln Bay wetland from urban activities. What goes down the drain ends up in the wetland and then into the Georges River.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE PROJECT

 

IMG_1568 IMG_1577 IMG_1580 IMG_1588 IMG_1595 IMG_1600

Lime Kiln Bay Wetland Guided Walks

W8. long-necked tortoiseOFF is conducting free guided walks around the Wetland to show interested people how the wetlands improve the quality of storm water runoff and the abundant native plants and wildlife that the wetland supports.

  • Tuesday 8 December 10am – 12 noon
  • Saturday 12 December 3pm – 5pm

Meet at the corner of Waterfall Rd and Acacia St Oatley.

Lime Kiln Bay Brochure CoverThe walks are part of  a  project undertaken by the society to raise awareness in the local community of potential environmental impacts on the wetland from urban activities. What goes down the drain ends up in the wetland and then into the Georges River.

The project is being funded from the NSW Minister for the Environment’s Conservation Fund. It will benefit the local community and Council by improving the long-term health of local waterways and reducing maintenance costs of Council’s drainage infrastructure.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE PROJECT

 

Regent Honey Eater Research – Capertee NP

Capertee NP Regent HE 12-18_10_2015 174OFF members are familiar with Capertee with two trips to Capertee National Park in 2012 & 2014. The society and members have provided some funding for research of Ross Crates (ANU PhD student) who is working on Regent Honey Eaters in Capertee NP. OFF recently donated some funds to Ross’s project to buy another video camera used for monitoring nests.

On 18 Nov Ross gave a update and reports ” the Regents are about to embark on a second round of nesting in Capertee NP. He reported there are three new nests near the homestead and another near the pump house on the river. Also he has found 4 new nests on “Home Hills”, the property immediately to the north and thinks another two are likely. He also reports that three fledglings from the first nesting effort in the NP are going OK. All sounds very exciting. ”

In 5 November Ross notes “  your camera will be up on a regent nest on friday. I have two new incubating females to monitor, and a hunch that there is one more to find in the national park.”

Capertee NP Regent HE 12-18_10_2015 002The Capertee River flows west to east, joining the Wolgan River at their confluence in Newnes. The river is fed by a number of minor tributaries in the upper reaches and forms part of the Hawkesbury-Nepean catchment. From the upper reaches of Bogee River to Glen Davis, the Capertee river flows through the Capertee Valley, which is internationally recognised and designated as an important bird area (IBA) by BirdLife International. This designation is principally due to the fact that the Capertee Valley is the core breeding range of the critically endangered Regent honeyeater. Once distributed throughout south eastern Australia from south Queensland to Adelaide, the species has suffered a major and ongoing population decline and associated range contraction. Current population estimates suggest there may be only 300-400 birds remaining. The Capertee Valley is now recognised as the core of the species’ breeding range, and is the only site in Australia where the species can be seen on a semi-regular basis.

600x600_Amyema cambag 1The Regent honeyeater is a ‘rich patch specialist.’ This means that for successful breeding to occur, individuals must locate rich sources of nectar with which to provision young, in habitat that provides dense cover to conceal nests from predators. The most important breeding site for regent honeyeaters in the Capertee Valley is the banks of the river itself. This riparian habitat of river she-oak Casuarina cunninghamii provides the nesting substrate required by regent honeyeaters. The stretch of the river in the vicinity of Genowlan bridge holds breeding birds in most years, (including the present year), as does the open valley floor of the Capertee National Park.The riparian habitat is also of vital importance because the river she-oaks play host to a species of needle-leaf mistletoe, Amyema cambagei. The flowers of the needle leaf mistletoe are another important nectar source for breeding regent honeyeaters.

IMG_8549 Capertee River at CoorongoobaThe river itself provides their only source of drinking and bathing water. During hot weather, birds can be seen frequently taking water from the river, and bathing to help regulate body temperature.  A regular supply of water is likely to become increasingly important for breeding Regent honeyeaters given projected climate change scenarios. In addition, the river provides a bountiful supply of invertebrate fauna, which is an important source of protein for both adult and young birds. It is highly likely that the abundance of insects in the vicinity of the river is determined by the presence of water in the river.

Also critical to the successful breeding of the regent honeyeater in the valley is the flowering of a small number of key eucalyptus species, in particular Yellow box E.melliodora, White box E.albens and Mugga ironbark E.sideroxylon. It is widely appreciated that the frequency and intensity of flowering in these species is moderated by soil moisture content; periods of low soil moisture are associated with poor flowering events, which in turn moderates the frequency of breeding opportunities of the Regent honeyeater.

IMG_4678 Regent Honeyeater male Chiltern June 2010Given the importance of the riparian habitat of the Capertee valley described, any drop in the water levels in the Capertee River is highly likely to have a significant detrimental impact upon the long-term persistence of the Regent honeyeater in the wild. A reduction in water levels is likely to reduce both the frequency and intensity of flowering in nearby eucalyptus species, as well as in the long-term persistence of both the river she-oak and needle-leaf mistletoe. Lack of access to water during the breeding season may either result directly in mortality of offspring during hot weather or indirectly by increasing the risk of nest predation if parents are forced to commute further from the nest to obtain water. Alternatively, it may also inhibit the initiation of breeding altogether. A reduction in invertebrate fauna in foraging areas of breeding regent honeyeaters would also limit the protein resources to provision chicks, which could either cause offspring mortality of have negative effects on the long-term health of the birds. In summary, a regular and plentiful supply of water in the Capertee river is fundamental to the functioning of the entire ecosystem, of which the regent honeyeater plays a critical part.

(Contact Ross at my number 6379 7767)

Drains are Just for Rain

IMG_1449IMG_1428Look out for messages being painted on drains in the Penshurst /Mortdale /Oatley area in coming months.

 






DRAINS ARE JUST FOR RAIN” is the slogan of Oatley Flora and Fauna Conservation Society (OFF) ‘Lime Kiln Bay Wetland Awareness’ project.

OFF is proceeding with the project having received support and approval from Hurstville City Council for stencilling of drains that flow into Lime Kiln Bay Wetland.

IMG_1421The aim of the project is to raise awareness in the local community of potential environmental impacts on the wetland from urban activities. What goes down the drain ends up in the wetland and then into the Georges River.

IMG_1420OFF is also conducting free guided walks around the Wetland to show interested people how the wetlands improve the quality of stormwater runoff and the abundant native plants and wildlife that the wetland supports. The first two walks are scheduled for Tuesday 8 December 10am – 12 noon and Saturday 12 December 3pm – 5pm starting from the corner of Waterfall Rd and Acacia St Oatley.

The project is being funded from the NSW Minister for the Environment’s Conservation Fund. It will benefit the local community and Council by improving the long-term health of local waterways and reducing maintenance costs of Council’s drainage infrastructure.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE PROJECT

 

 

 

OFF Volunteer of the Year

John Davoran awardJulian Sheen  accompanied John Davoren, our Newsletter editor to this year’s volunteer awards at Hurstville Council Chambers. John was nominated by Oatley Flora and Fauna and received his award for the diligence and imagination he has put into our newsletter over the last eight years. The Newsletter is not only a resource for our members, but a reference point for conservationists across the city. Well done John.These awards are an important part in celebrating, acknowledging and thanking those people who have provided invaluable services across our community.