Wetlands Day 2 February

 World Wetlands Day is celebrated internationally each year on 2 February. It marks the anniversary of the signing of the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance (Ramsar Convention) in Ramsar, Iran, on 2 February 1971.

World Wetlands Day was first celebrated in 1997. Since then government agencies, non-government organisations and community groups have celebrated World Wetlands Day by undertaking actions to raise public awareness of wetland values and benefits and promote the conservation and wise use of wetlands.  For more see Department of Environment

W8. long-necked tortoiseW5.royal spoonbill

 

Drains are for Rain

The Leader 20 Jan 2016 Its clear drains are for rain so butt out
Oatley Flora and Fauna Conservation Society  is painting messages on drains in the Penshurst, Mortdale and Oatley area to remind people of what drains are for and what their misuse can do to wetlands and river systems. Their current target is the drain system that flows into the Lime Kiln Bay wetland.
 
Leader published the photos and LKB/ drain stencilling story in Wed 20 January 2016 edition..
It is on-line on The Leader website.  There is room on the website version for the public to make comments.

Lime Kiln Bay Guided Walks

IMG_1683OFF conducted free guided walks on 8 and 12 December around Lime Kiln Bay Wetland to show interested people how the wetlands improve the quality of storm water runoff and the abundant native plants and wildlife that the wetland supports.

The walks are part of  a  project undertaken by the society to raise awareness in the local community of potential environmental impacts on the wetland from urban activities. What goes down the drain ends up in the wetland and then into the Georges River. The project is being funded from the NSW Minister for the Environment’s Conservation Fund. It will benefit the local community and Council by improving the long-term health of local waterways and reducing maintenance costs of Council’s drainage infrastructure.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE Project

CLICK HERE FOR PHOTOS OF THE WALKIMG_1723 IMG_1721

Perils of Plastic- Prof Banati visits Myles Dunphy Reserve

IMG_1674Our Stream Watch group were fortunate to have a on site visit from Professor Banati Leader of the ANSTO Plastics project.
The increased presence of certain degradable plastics, including biodegradable plastics, is a challenge for the recycling of plastics more generally since the various plastics can be difficult to sort. Contamination of the waste stream with similar appearing but non-recyclable material by many seen as the Achilles heel of recycling.  A significant portion of plastic waste ends up in our oceans.
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Professor Banati said the team’s observations were changing perceptions about how the increased degradability of a material, such as plastic, may help to reduce the litter problem but, if not properly managed, might cause a contamination problem in the future.
Recent research shows that this is problematic due to the chemicals contained within plastics, as well as the pollutants that plastic attract once they are in the marine environment. For more see Guardian Dec 2014


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 ANSTO contributes to this collaborative research effort by using nuclear technologies to measure minute quantities of material such as the contaminants potentially leaching or being absorbed by degrading plastic material. ANSTO has national and international collaborations current work is being undertaken with Monash University, UTAS and CSIRO.



IMG_1676Other Research

In a new study, published Dec 2014 by the journal Royal Society Open Science, a British scientist reports the riddle of the “missing” plastic as solved: It sits in deep waters, broken down into tiny fibers and embedded in the sediment of the most remote places on Earth.

The discovery of microplastic in such remote marine habitats raises new questions about the potential for plastic debris to contaminate the food chain. Scientists have already documented that fish, birds, turtles, and other marine animals eat plastic. Thompson and his team found an even greater accumulation of plastic than previously suspected. The more plastic there is, he says, the more potential for toxicity to marine life.

Read more on the National Geographic article – Where has all the (Sea Trash) Plastic Gone

Mark Coure MP launches “Drains are Just for Rain”

Mark Coure 25 Nov (2)On 25 November, Mark Coure MP launched OFF storm water drain stencil project. The society plans to stencil 120 signs to raise awareness in the local community of potential environmental impacts on the Lime Kiln Bay wetland from urban activities. What goes down the drain ends up in the wetland and then into the Georges River.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE PROJECT

 

IMG_1568 IMG_1577 IMG_1580 IMG_1588 IMG_1595 IMG_1600

Lime Kiln Bay Wetland Guided Walks

W8. long-necked tortoiseOFF is conducting free guided walks around the Wetland to show interested people how the wetlands improve the quality of storm water runoff and the abundant native plants and wildlife that the wetland supports.

  • Tuesday 8 December 10am – 12 noon
  • Saturday 12 December 3pm – 5pm

Meet at the corner of Waterfall Rd and Acacia St Oatley.

Lime Kiln Bay Brochure CoverThe walks are part of  a  project undertaken by the society to raise awareness in the local community of potential environmental impacts on the wetland from urban activities. What goes down the drain ends up in the wetland and then into the Georges River.

The project is being funded from the NSW Minister for the Environment’s Conservation Fund. It will benefit the local community and Council by improving the long-term health of local waterways and reducing maintenance costs of Council’s drainage infrastructure.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE PROJECT

 

Drains are Just for Rain

IMG_1449IMG_1428Look out for messages being painted on drains in the Penshurst /Mortdale /Oatley area in coming months.

 






DRAINS ARE JUST FOR RAIN” is the slogan of Oatley Flora and Fauna Conservation Society (OFF) ‘Lime Kiln Bay Wetland Awareness’ project.

OFF is proceeding with the project having received support and approval from Hurstville City Council for stencilling of drains that flow into Lime Kiln Bay Wetland.

IMG_1421The aim of the project is to raise awareness in the local community of potential environmental impacts on the wetland from urban activities. What goes down the drain ends up in the wetland and then into the Georges River.

IMG_1420OFF is also conducting free guided walks around the Wetland to show interested people how the wetlands improve the quality of stormwater runoff and the abundant native plants and wildlife that the wetland supports. The first two walks are scheduled for Tuesday 8 December 10am – 12 noon and Saturday 12 December 3pm – 5pm starting from the corner of Waterfall Rd and Acacia St Oatley.

The project is being funded from the NSW Minister for the Environment’s Conservation Fund. It will benefit the local community and Council by improving the long-term health of local waterways and reducing maintenance costs of Council’s drainage infrastructure.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE PROJECT

 

 

 

River Health Monitoring on Georges River

The Myles Dunphy Streamwatch group once again participated in River Health Monitoring by GRCC (Georges River Combined Council) for the Spring season. Our results for Myles Dunphy and Dairy Creek were similar to previous years. For more see River Health Report Cards

Macro Invertebrate ResultsIMG_1357

      The day at Dharawal started very foggy and a light drizzle as we tested the Iluka site in the upland swamp. It cleared up as we moved further away from the coast. We welcomed our new coordinator to Dharawal, He is passionate about his bugs and put on his waders at Cobong Creek.

IMG_1360IMG_1353CLICK HERE TO SEE GALLERY

Dolphins on Georges River

About 6 dolphins have returned to the river.  They were spotted on Sunday 1 November and again on Monday 2 November around 5:30 pm. Amongst them was the one with the notched fin as well as one with part of the fin missing which have been spotted on the river before. Thank you to Peter and Antonia Hayler of Choosypix for sending in these fantastic photos.

Environmentally Friendly Sea Walls in Kogarah Bay

IMG_20151029_172821Kogarah City Council has developed a number of foreshore habitat enhancement projects to supplement existing foreshore areas and improve biodiversity. Members of the Georges River Combined Council were recently taken around the Korgrah Council’s latest environmentally friendly seawall project at Carss Park.
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 The introduction of foreshore armouring, such as seawall structures, transforms the nature of the intertidal environment, replacing biologically diverse natural foreshore habitats with featureless, species poor artificial structures. This alteration away from natural intertidal systems results in reduced marine species diversity and abundance.
An earlier project at Dover Park East foreshore, Kogarah Bay, NSW was a major Council enhancement project completed in July 2012.
IMG_20151029_174618These projects utilised intertidal enhancement research and the 2009 NSW Office of Environment and Heritage released Environmentally Friendly Seawall Guide.
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