Oatley Park

For a map of Oatley Park and Lime Kiln Bay >>Click here

Maps for 6 short bush walks >>Click here

A map of the Oatley Park – Lime Kiln Bay circuit walk (6.4km, 2 hours) >>Click here

Oatley Park protects important examples of the natural environment which occurred throughout the area before the spread of suburbs. Within its boundaries are numerous micro-habitats giving protection to a variety of native plants and to animals which rely on those plants for food, shelter and nesting.

HISTORY OF OATLEY PARK

An area of 112 acres was dedicated for Public Recreation in the NSW Government Gazette on 25th March 1887. The sandy bay of Oatley Park has long been used as a swimming spot for local residents.  The Oatley Swimming Club was founded in 1927. Threats over the years have included: Helipad, increased sporting facilities, mountain bikes and telecommunication towers.

>> Read Alan Fairley’s Oatley Park History Click here


SEAS
A.helianthi3ONAL BLOOMS OF OATLEY PARK
Alan Fairle
y’s month by month description and photos of what’s blooming in Oatley Park. See monthly posts on SEASONAL BLOOMS

 

NATI799px-Acacia_pycnantha_Golden_WattleVE PLANTS OF OATLEY PARK
Alan Fairley’s detailed description of the native plants of Oatley Park and the Lime Kiln Bay wetland
s.
>> Flora of Oatley Park

 

 

CIMG5878FAUNA OF OATLEY PARK
The park provides a sanctuary for many species of animal >> Fauna of Oatley Park

 

 

April,May,June 223BIRDS OF OATLEY PARK

Common Birds

Migratory Species

Bushland Residents

Wetland & River Birds

For copies of the  photographic guide published by the Society – phone Secretary Ph: 95806621 or email Website Officer at off@oatleypark.com. Or down load pdf (5mb) see Birds of Oatley Park Photo Guide

 

PHOTOS
To see Flickr website photos of Bushland areas of Hurstville.

 

 


LIME KILN BAY : INCREASING BIO-DIVERSITY
When the weeds were cleared from upper Lime Kiln Bay a few years ago and a new wetland created by Hurstville City Council in an attempt to improve the quality of water flowing into Georges River, it was interesting to observe if the new habitat would attract aquatic fauna.

What would visit the area first? Would any water birds or other noticeable fauna become permanent residents? Would any unusual species unrecorded in the Oatley/Mortdale district appear or perhaps re-establish themselves after decades of absence?

All these were intriguing questions to the interested local naturalist…
>> David Waterhouse’s story